jeffreythompson:

Some BG’s from “Soos and the Real Girl”. Soos’s bedroom! Top three were designed and drawn by Ian Worrel, and painted by myself. The bottom image was painted and designed by me. 

(via lilgideonsdeadhouse)

just so we don’t have another “Coraline was made by Tim Burton” deal on our hands

saccharinescorpion:

The Book of Life

  • is directed by Jorge Gutierrez, creator of of El Tigre. he is the major figure behind the movie, having come up with the idea originally as well
  • is produced by several people, one of whom is Guillermo del Toro, director of Pan’s Labyrinth, Pacific Rim, etc 
  • is written by Jorge Gutierrez, joined by Doug Langdale, creator of The Weekenders
  • has several character designs by Sandra Equihua, Gutierrez’s wife and co-creator of El Tigre

(via genalovestoons)

cishaming:

circumvolve:

"So, you’re probably a girl, right? Wrong? No, I was right the first time. …wrong?"
-Gravity Falls Season 2 Episode 5.
The scene takes place at the entrance of a Hot Topic-esque clothing store in a mall. Soos (the character on the left) enters, says the line, and we cut to the next scene. The character on the right doesn’t say or do anything.
I’m really disappointed and frustrated. This is not acceptable, this content is harmful towards trans people. 
Being gendered by strangers is a daily trial for me and many trans people. I don’t appreciate making a joke out of such a situation. We have almost no media representation or agency so when you make jokes like this, it speaks over us. Even in this scene, the character on the right doesn’t get to say or do anything, they just get to stand there and be the butt of an incredibly disrespectful joke.
I was taken aback when this scene happened because I didn’t expect the writers of Gravity Falls to stoop so low.

Not the first time they’ve made jokes at trans people’s expense tbh

cishaming:

circumvolve:

"So, you’re probably a girl, right? Wrong? No, I was right the first time. …wrong?"

-Gravity Falls Season 2 Episode 5.

The scene takes place at the entrance of a Hot Topic-esque clothing store in a mall. Soos (the character on the left) enters, says the line, and we cut to the next scene. The character on the right doesn’t say or do anything.

I’m really disappointed and frustrated. This is not acceptable, this content is harmful towards trans people. 

Being gendered by strangers is a daily trial for me and many trans people. I don’t appreciate making a joke out of such a situation. We have almost no media representation or agency so when you make jokes like this, it speaks over us. Even in this scene, the character on the right doesn’t get to say or do anything, they just get to stand there and be the butt of an incredibly disrespectful joke.

I was taken aback when this scene happened because I didn’t expect the writers of Gravity Falls to stoop so low.

Not the first time they’ve made jokes at trans people’s expense tbh

(via chibiriku)

disneyconceptsandstuff:

James Lopez, a veteran Disney animator (The Lion King, Pocahontas, Paperman), is currently trying to raise money for his traditionally animated project Hullabaloo. Hullabaloo is a steampunk short film which Lopez is hoping will help save the cause of 2D animation, and possibly lead to a TV series or film. So, if you’re interested in badass steampunk ladies or traditional animation, may I recommend you give a dollar or two. Hullabaloo's IndieGogo page is over here, visit to donate and learn more! And I’ll conclude with the plot: 

Hullabaloo is the story of Veronica Daring, a brilliant young scientist who returns home from an elite finishing school to find her father—the eccentric inventor Jonathan Daring—missing without a trace! The only clue left behind points Veronica toward Daring Adventures, an abandoned amusement park used by her father to test his fantastical steam-powered inventions. There she discovers a strange girl named Jules, a fellow inventor who agrees to help Veronica in locating her missing father and discovering the secrets of his work.

Together, Veronica and Jules learn that Jonathan Daring has been kidnapped by a mysterious group of influential persons, who seek to use his latest invention for nefarious purposes. These villains are wealthy and influential and neither Veronica nor Jules can stop them openly. But determined to save her father and holding true to the family creed that technology should be used for the good of all, not the greed of some, Veronica assumes the secret identity of “Hullabaloo”, a goggled crusader who uses wits and science to combat evil and oppose the nefarious conspiracy that has taken her father.

(via turbomun)

tehkableckablam:

poppypicklesticks:

shinobhi:

When I first heard about this show, my first thought was literally “Ohhhhhhhh fuck. A TV show about an Indian kid with a pet snake? This is not, not good.”
I actually watched it too see just how bad it would be, being the masochist that I am. I prepared myself for a LOT of snake charmer jokes, incorrect allusions to Hindu mythology, and a bad accent. To my surprise, however, it actually turned out to be good. Sanjay wasn’t some Apu-style caricature. This was the first cartoon I had ever seen that not only had an Indian lead character, but one that wasn’t some bullshit stereotype. This kid was believable: an ordinary 12-year-old kid with a pet he loved, as well as a penchant for video games and junk food. He could have well been a “regular” white kid.
So it actually sort of saddens me to hear people crack down on this show, saying it “lacks intelligence” and is “too silly”. News flash, that’s what kid’s cartoons are supposed to be for: they’re meant to be silly comedy that elicit giggles while you’re watching the.
If Sanjay and Craig had been around when I was 9-12 years old, I would have been a huge fan, mainly because of the representation. Keep Sanjay and Craig on TV, because with any luck, it’ll spark a trend of equal representation in kid’s cartoons, something we need just as much as representation in YA works.

is this from the guy who made Bob’s Burgers because I am guessing that based on the character designs for some reason 

Pretty sure the character designer on BB worked on this, actually.

tehkableckablam:

poppypicklesticks:

shinobhi:

When I first heard about this show, my first thought was literally “Ohhhhhhhh fuck. A TV show about an Indian kid with a pet snake? This is not, not good.”

I actually watched it too see just how bad it would be, being the masochist that I am. I prepared myself for a LOT of snake charmer jokes, incorrect allusions to Hindu mythology, and a bad accent. To my surprise, however, it actually turned out to be good. Sanjay wasn’t some Apu-style caricature. This was the first cartoon I had ever seen that not only had an Indian lead character, but one that wasn’t some bullshit stereotype. This kid was believable: an ordinary 12-year-old kid with a pet he loved, as well as a penchant for video games and junk food. He could have well been a “regular” white kid.

So it actually sort of saddens me to hear people crack down on this show, saying it “lacks intelligence” and is “too silly”. News flash, that’s what kid’s cartoons are supposed to be for: they’re meant to be silly comedy that elicit giggles while you’re watching the.

If Sanjay and Craig had been around when I was 9-12 years old, I would have been a huge fan, mainly because of the representation. Keep Sanjay and Craig on TV, because with any luck, it’ll spark a trend of equal representation in kid’s cartoons, something we need just as much as representation in YA works.

is this from the guy who made Bob’s Burgers because I am guessing that based on the character designs for some reason 

Pretty sure the character designer on BB worked on this, actually.

(Source: lord-erbus, via itsyamtastic)

gravi-teamfalls:

Scary-oke Storyboard Highlights by Luke Weber

See his entire third act storyboard at http://fresherluke.tumblr.com! 

(via arieltheevilgenius)

bartleby-thescrivener:

"The relationship with Disney would be both a blessing and a curse for the animators. The curse was that their work was often ignored by the larger mass media, who maintained biased stereotypes about Disney as a repressive, dystopian corporate oligarchy. The blessing, however, was that they could produce their work under a relatively secure cloud of anonymity absent from other major studios and could, therefore, focus more closely on the quality of their work. The result, in many cases, was some superbly crafted and intelligently written television animation that quite clearly ranks among the genre’s finest achievements. This is an important point to consider, especially when these projects are analyzed in depth, which is something the intimidating and hegemony of the Disney studio has limited in the past.
The Weekenders is ne plus ultra example. The series is remarkable chiefly for what it was not rather than what it was. It boldly rejected traditional storytelling approaches in favor of a practice that more directly and stridently affirmed it as a unique cultural product, subtly recasting the sitcom in its own image. […] It did so in a way that belies most television animation stereotypes, gathering comedy from realism rather than exaggeration.”

Excerpt from America Toons In: A History Of Television Animation by David Perlmutter

The Weekenders is scheduled a superb, under recognized show

(Source: disneystheweekenders, via itsyamtastic)

gravi-teamfalls:

Rough Color Script by Jeffrey Thompson http://jeffreythompson.tumblr.com

gravi-teamfalls:

Rough Color Script by Jeffrey Thompson http://jeffreythompson.tumblr.com

(via arieltheevilgenius)


To promote Animaniacs before the show’s premiere, a giant balloon in the shape of Yakko was placed on top of the water tower on the Warner Bros. lot. Unfortunately, no one told Bob Daley, who ran the studio. When he pulled into work that morning, he thought someone had put a bad Mickey Mouse balloon on the tower and ordered it removed. The inflatable Yakko was in place for less than 12 hours, and then popped shortly after he came down. Writer Paul Rugg was able to snap a photo to prove it happened.

To promote Animaniacs before the show’s premiere, a giant balloon in the shape of Yakko was placed on top of the water tower on the Warner Bros. lot. Unfortunately, no one told Bob Daley, who ran the studio. When he pulled into work that morning, he thought someone had put a bad Mickey Mouse balloon on the tower and ordered it removed. The inflatable Yakko was in place for less than 12 hours, and then popped shortly after he came down. Writer Paul Rugg was able to snap a photo to prove it happened.

(Source: rinnysega, via peppermintfeather)

otherbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK
We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

Did you guess yet?

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.
Have you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”
Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

You are my new favourite tumblr user.

otherbuttons:

damianimated:

LETS PLAY A GAME. It’s called: Who directed it TIM BURTON or HENRY SELICK

We’ll start with the 2009 Laika film Coraline based on the novel by Neil Gaiman. Do you know who directed it? Burton or Selick?

image

Did you guess yet?

image

If you guessed Henry Selick, you would be correct. Tim Burton actually had absolutely nothing to do with Coraline at all in anyway ever. Reminder: Tim Burton has NOTHING to do with Coraline. At all. But that was an easy one. Let’s go to the Walt Disney Pictures adaptation of Roald Dahl’s novel, James and the Giant Peach next.

image

Think you got it? Are you sure? Better double check…

image

Oh, look. It’s Henry Selick again! Tim Burton actually interacted with this project, though only as a producer. Bet that was tricky… Next one! Let’s go to the Disney/Touchstone Pictures film Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas.

imageHave you guessed it correctly? Have you really?

image

Yep that’s right. Even Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas was directed by Henry Selick. Though Burton wrote the poem and created the characters in which Nightmare was based he didn’t have much interaction with the project beyond that. At the time he had already signed off to direct the film Batman Returns and did not want to be involved with the “painstakingly slow process of stop-motion animation.”

Looks like it was a trick quiz. But now you know Henry Selick, whom people rarely know of is responsible for many of the most well known stop-motion animated films. The more you know!

You are my new favourite tumblr user.

(via hollow-requiem)